Tuesday, February 5, 2019

What a great man!

Knocking at Haven's Door

I didn't brag properly. Whassamatterwime??

I'm not saying Kreeft is a brilliant man just because he said this about my book. But take a look!

"Rarely has a book suddenly and decisively changed my mind on an important religious or moral issue. This one did. I was uncertain and “on the fence” regarding immigration, with almost equal sympathy for both “sides.” No Catholic faithful to the Church and no Christian faithful to Bible can be “on the fence” any more after reading this book. It is clear, compelling, and decisive. Yet it is reasonable, nuanced, scholarly, factual, informed, and wide-ranging. It appeals to principles and facts, not feelings, ideologies, or political partisanship. It is equally far from the “Right” and the “Left,” from fundamentalistic fanaticism and romantic naivete. For it is Catholic."

Peter Kreeft
Professor of Philosophy
Boston College

That's a generous man!

He's talking about a short book, an hour's read, that's supposed to pop your eyes open. I promise that if you read this attentively -- one hour! -- I'll re-arrange the way you think about some things.

Knocking at Haven's Door

Monday, January 21, 2019

The appropriation of Catholic teaching on abortion


An old friend from the pro-life movement has been tossing Catholic stuff at me, attacking “social justice warriors” – or SJWs, an acronym that reduces six syllables to five and obscures what you’re saying, but it’s an insult.

I’m a pro-life SJW, and so are the Catholic leaders whose words are being abused by the cultural warriors of the right. There are three fundamental documents that the right abuses: Humanae Vitae, Familiaris Consortio, and The Gospel of Life). All three incorporate a social justice approach. The first time the documents are censored and abused it might be just careless. But when anti-abortion chanters with bulldog brains repeat the careless errors, that seems stupid. And when they persevere after hearing the truth, that seems dishonest.

Humanae Vitae

Pope Paul VI wrote the encyclical Humanae Vitae. It’s odd listening to people talk about Paul VI; some people describe him as a neglected leftwing prophet of social justice; others describe him as a persecuted rightwing prophet of personal morality. Was he schizophrenic, or a convert from one side to the other? I think he was, more simply, consistent. And I note that Humanae Vitae makes three arguments about contraception, not just one. He asserted that sex and babies are connected, and the connection is noteworthy. He said that women have wombs, and that’s special; John Paul II repeated that at length in his “theology of the body.” But he also decried the looming threat of global population control. He did not limit his perspective to issues of personal morality; he saw a social and political dimension, and challenged us to see that too.

Global population control was and is racist. The funding and propaganda comes from Europe and America; the targets are Africa and Asia and Latin America. And global population control has always included immigration restrictions: if you can’t depopulate the whole world, you can at least protect Europe and America from the rising tide of color.

It is dishonest to use the teaching of Pope Paul VI, quoting pieces out of context, refusing to notice that his arguments include opposition to population control. He puts abortion in a SJW framework.

Familiaris Consortio

St. John Paul II wrote the apostolic exhortation Familiaris Consortio, on the Feast of Christ the King in 1981. It includes (see FC, 46) a list of the rights of families. That list includes the right of a family to migrate – in search of a better life.

Evangelium Vitae, The Gospel of Life

The focus of this encyclical, published by St. John Paul II on the Feast of the Annunciation in 1995, is abortion. However, the Pope is unambiguous about the context in which he sees abortion. (See EV 3.)

“Today this proclamation is especially pressing because of the extraordinary increase and gravity of threats to the life of individuals and peoples, especially where life is weak and defenseless. In addition to the ancient scourges of poverty, hunger, endemic diseases, violence and war, new threats are emerging on an alarmingly vast scale.” [Emphasis added.]

He continues: “The Second Vatican Council, in a passage which retains all its relevance today, forcefully condemned a number of crimes and attacks against human life. Thirty years later, taking up the words of the Council and with the same forcefulness I repeat that condemnation in the name of the whole Church, certain that I am interpreting the genuine sentiment of every upright conscience: ‘Whatever is opposed to life itself, such as any type of murder, genocide, abortion, euthanasia, or willful self-destruction, whatever violates the integrity of the human person, such as mutilation, torments inflicted on body or mind, attempts to coerce the will itself; whatever insults human dignity, such as subhuman living conditions, arbitrary imprisonment, deportation, slavery, prostitution, the selling of women and children; as well as disgraceful working conditions, where people are treated as mere instruments of gain rather than as free and responsible persons; all these things and others like them are infamies indeed. They poison human society, and they do more harm to those who practice them than to those who suffer from the injury. Moreover, they are a supreme dishonor to the Creator.’(5)” The footnote refers to Gaudium et Spes, #27. [Emphasis added.]

It is not honest to refer to these documents while deliberately and forcefully rejecting a “seamless garment” approach. You can denounce SJWs, OR you can claim to be following the teaching of the Catholic Church. But you can’t do both.

Friday, January 18, 2019

healing and hospitality


Today (1/17) is the feast of St. Anthony, who fled into the desert – not to escape from the legitimate demands of love, but to escape from the reign of superficial and demented and mis-shapen nonsense and evil.

So, I hear in my heart a question from yesterday and an answer today.

Yesterday’s Gospel reading was from the beginning of Mark’s Gospel, or near the beginning. It was another story – this one a very brief vignette – tying salvation and hospitality together. Jesus healed Peter’s mother-in-law, and she got up and served. The clear proof that she was healed was that she offered hospitality.

Is that generalizable? Is it true for everyone that healing leads directly and promptly to hospitality? That penance and reconciliation lead to the Eucharist, that Good Friday leads to Easter, that the parting of the Red Sea is followed by manna in the desert, that the end of evil is the beginning of love? Or is it specific to her? Is it just Peter’s mother-in-law who does this? Is she a neurotic fussy busy gotta-clean guests-must-sit-and-eat-some-more type, who starts to buzz as soon as she has a muscle that works?

Anthony, who fled to the desert to listen to God, was hospitable to those who sought him and caught him. A healthy heart offers hospitality.

Friday, January 4, 2019

American saints -- and migration


Today is the feast of St. Elizabeth Ann Seton. She’s among the small handful of men and women who have been canonized by the Catholic Church who are known for their work in what is now the United States. I think it’s worthwhile looking at the list of American saint, with an eye on issues of migration.

First, the whole list: there are 11 canonized saints known for their work in the United States.

1.       St. Frances Xavier Cabrini. From Italy, worked with Italians immigrants
2.       St. Junipero Serra, from Catalonia (Spain), came north from Mexico and worked with native Americans
3.       St. Marianne Cope, immigrant from Germany, worked with leprosy patients in Hawaii
4.       St. Damien de Veuster, “Damien the Leper,” from Belgium, worked with leprosy patients in Hawaii
5.       St. Rose Philippine Duchesne, from France, worked with pioneers west of Mississippi and with Native Americans
6.       St. Mother Theodore Guerin, from France, worked with American pioneers in Indiana
7.       St. Isaac Jogues, from France, worked with Native Americans in New York
8.       St. John Neumann, from Bohemia (Czech Republic), worked with German immigrants
9.       St. Elizabeth Ann Seton, from New York, worked with the people of Maryland
10.   St. Kateri Tekakwitha, Mohawk from New York, life of prayer in Montreal
11.   St. Katherine Drexel, from Philadelphia, worked with African Americans and Native Americans

Of those eleven, eight were immigrants themselves:
1.       St. Frances Xavier Cabrini, from Italy
2.       St. Junipero Serra, from Catalonia (Spain)
3.       St. Marianne Cope, from Germany
4.       St. Damien de Veuster, “Damien the Leper,” from Belgium
5.       St. Rose Philippine Duchesne, from France
6.       St. Mother Theodore Guerin, from France
7.       St. Isaac Jogues, from France
8.       St. John Neumann, from Bohemia (Czech Republic)

Of the eleven, seven worked with Native Americans. Obviously, Native Americans are not immigrants, unless their ancestors strayed south of the Rio Grande for too long. But from the perspective of Native Americans, settlers of European descent are immigrants. There are host/guest issues here. Anyway, the seven:
1.       St. Junipero Serra, worked with Native Americans in Mexico and California
2.       St. Marianne Cope, worked with leprosy patients in Hawaii
3.       St. Damien de Veuster, worked with leprosy patients in Hawaii
4.       St. Rose Philippine Duchesne, worked with pioneers west of Mississippi and with Native Americans
5.       St. Isaac Jogues, from France, worked with Native Americans in New York
6.       St. Kateri Tekakwitha was herself Mohawk from New York
7.       St. Katherine Drexel, worked with African Americans and Native Americans

Six of the eleven worked with immigrants or internal migrants – that is, pioneers:

1.       St. Frances Xavier Cabrini worked with Italians immigrants
2.       St. Rose Philippine Duchesne worked with pioneers (migrants) west of Mississippi
3.       St. Mother Theodore Guerin with American pioneers (migrants) in Indiana
4.       St. John Neumann worked with German immigrants
5.       St. Elizabeth Ann Seton ran schools – AND worked with orphans from immigrant families
6.       St. Kateri Tekakwitha lived among Europeans, all immigrants from her perspective
7.       St. Katherine Drexel worked with involuntary immigrants – that is, slaves and their descendants

To me it seems bizarre beyond belief that an American Catholic could be persuaded to adopt an unwelcoming stance – or even hostility – toward immigrants.

Tuesday, January 1, 2019

The names of Jesus


New Year’s Day, the eighth day of Christmas.

The reading at Mass today is from Luke’s Gospel, about the shepherds visiting, and about naming Jesus. I was struck afresh by the name. Matthew’s Gospel also says that the child’s name is Jesus, but adds that, in accord with the Isaiah’s prophecy, he will be called Emmanuel.

Jesus means Savior. Emmanuel means God-with-us.

With us: what does that mean? I think it means that someone was visiting someone, that there was a host and guest – although it wasn’t necessarily clear which was which. When the King of the Universe comes to his own (and his own people debate whether to acknowledge him), who’s host, and who’s guest? Throughout Scripture, the issue of host/guest relations comes up over and over, and they are often intermingled – not in confusion, but in unity. They are brought together as one. The key images in Scripture of the unity of the Trinity are: (1) the Father/Son relationship, the two united by the Spirit of Love; and (2) marriage of the husband and wife, who are made one by the Spirit of Love, and (3) the unity of host and guest united by love, as at Mamre and the Visitation and indeed the Incarnation.

Which means: one aspect of the title “Emmanuel” is that it refers to God’s participation in a host/guest relationship with us. It’s about hospitality.

Jesus and Emmanuel: Savior and host/guest. The two names of Jesus correspond to the names of Moses’ children, Gershom and Eliezer. From Exodus 18: 3-4: “One of these was named Gershom; for he [Moses] said, ‘I am a resident alien in a foreign land.’ The other was named Eliezer; for he said, “The God of my father is my help; he has rescued me from Pharaoh’s sword.” (Ger: stranger. El: God. Ezer: help.) The names of Moses’ children refer to hospitality and salvation, like the names Emmanuel and Jesus.

In John’s account of the Last Supper, Jesus washes the feet of his disciples. Explaining this, he says that they call him Lord – and they should, because he is. But he adds carefully: this is what his lordship looks like! You serve, you wash the feet of your guests, like Abraham. That is, his lordship is – in large part – about hospitality. When we speak of Jesus as Lord and Savior, that lordship includes the Lord as Host at a banquet. Lord and Savior: this conjunction of two titles also echoes the names of Jesus and the names of Moses’ two sons.

Indeed, when Jesus taught his disciples to pray, he taught them to address God as Father, and to bless his name and affirm his will – and then to ask for bread and forgiveness – that is, for hospitality and salvation.

In our time, hospitality is often considered to be a minor matter, optional and decorative. But look at the pairs! Emmanuel and Jesus. Gershom and Eliezer. Holy Thursday and Good Friday. Lord and Savior. Hospitality and forgiveness.

Hospitality is a ray of light emanating from the fiery love that is the heart of the Trinity. Yes, it decorates. No, it is not merely decorative.